EAT-JAPAN Recipes
Level
Easy

Pasta is always a popular choice, whether you’re dining out or dining in. The same goes for Japan, but their pasta dishes have often been adapted to suit native tastes by including Japanese ingredients. And the secret to making things taste Japanese is a little splash of soy sauce, Japan’s ultimate condiment. It’s full of umami, just like the tomato, so you’ll still get that mouthwatering taste. Soy sauce can also be used in Bolognese sauces for a subtle flavour and umami boost. This recipe is a simple linguine dish that makes the most of soy sauce.

Miso is most commonly used to make miso soup, an everyday dish in Japan, but there are many more ways to create delicious dishes with miso. This thick, rich, and satisfying pea soup combines the richness of miso with a British classic; it’s so warming and wholesome that you’ll soon be wondering why you ever made soup without miso. Incorporating miso into your diet will also boost your nutrition: miso is a high energy whole food, packed with friendly bacteria. Remember the old adage about an apple a day? In Japan, it’s a bowl of nourishing miso soup.

Tofu is a staple of Japanese cuisine, eaten by millions every day. It’s a powerhouse of protein and essential nutrients, all in one simple ingredient. This stir-fry is an easy way to cook tofu at home, and a great way to get started if you’ve never tried making tofu dishes before. Once you’ve got the hang of it, you’ll discover that tofu is one of the most versatile ingredients around. Whatever you’re making, there will be a tofu type to fit. But whatever the firmness, one thing won’t change: the great nutritional benefits of tofu.

A light and healthy dish that's perfect for summer. Also a good example of the neba-neba group of foods, neba-neba meaning slippery, sticky or slimy. Try it and see!
This soup may look delicate, but the dashi ensures that it provides a distinctly satisfying flavour.
A typical comfort food, with every family in Japan having their own recipe.
This subtle and elegant dish showcases the delicate flavour of a much-loved Japanese staple, tofu.
A quick and delicious way to use up leftover rice and grilled fish. Perfect for a light summer supper.
A quick and simple way to enjoy these thick, filling noodles. Experiment by adding toppings until you create your perfect combination.
This recipe makes a basic mentsuyu for dipping noodles. Experiment with ratios to find your perfect combination!
A fabulously fresh shochu-based cocktail, ideal for chic afternoon garden parties and balmy summer evenings.
This makes a sweet tasting vinegar sauce that aids the digestion and cleanses the palate. It should be used with vegetables and salads; it's not recommended for meat or fish. It's particularly well suited to root vegetables such as ginger, lotus root and daikon radish.
This is a wonderful sauce, packed with the goodness of miso, that can be used to accompany vegetables, meat or fish. Try simmering some konnyaku (Devil's Tongue Jelly) in dashi, then coating with miso sauce for a hearty treat.
This smooth and delicious sauce can be enjoyed as it is, but is even better with some crushed, toasted sesame seeds for some extra crunch. It makes a delicious addition to boiled vegetables and fried foods.
This classic sauce is a favourite in Japanese cooking. Enjoy it with broiled or simmered food. Spread over seafood, chicken or vegetables before grilling, adding more sauce just before serving.
This simple yet satisfying dish packs a powerful umami punch, whilst the spring onions and ginger combine to create a light, refreshing taste.
An easy and refreshing alternative to traditional nibbles. Prepare this delicately tangy snack a few days in advance.
Aromatic and crispy-Japan's handiest meal
This is the Japanese equivalent of risotto, and results in beautifully soft brown rice.
Mix cute colours up with traditional Japanese flavours for a mountain of mini-treats.
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