EAT-JAPAN Recipes
Cooking Time
30 - 60 minutes
Cute, colourful and simple, these two delightful versions of sushi will charm any guest at a party.

When making nigirizushi, it is imperative to have all the necessary ingredients to hand before you begin. If you are right handed, the sushi rice should be in a bowl on your right. Besides the toppings, you should also have wasabi to hand, and a bowl of tezu, or vinegared water for dipping hands.

Tezu is essential, because without it, the rice will stick to your hands. Ordinary water will not do either, because this will wash the sushi vinegar off the rice, and affect taste and consistency.

This kind of sushi is somewhat similar to nigirizushi, in that a ball of rice is shaped by hand, and other ingredients placed on top. The difference is that a strip or nori is wrapped around the sushi, to form a wall that prevents the toppings, which are typically various fish roe, from falling off.
Stimulates the appetite with the gentle heat of its nanbanzuke marinade.
Sushi's not just raw fish on rice cas these delicate little parcels prove. Admittedly, they're a little bit fiddly - but well worth the effort!
Using dashi doesn't always have to mean a soup-based dish, as this thick rolled sushi shows. Experiment with your own fillings to create colourful, flavoursome, healthy finger food.
The warming goodness of miso gives this wholesome dish a real hearty kick. Perfect comfort food.
Genghis Khan, as well as being a barbaric historical figure, is also the name of a delicious lamb dish, supposedly based on Mongolian barbeque - head up to the north island, Hokkaido, to enjoy it at its best or, more realistically, recreate it as kebabs on your own barbeque.
Popular in Western Japan, this traditional form of sushi sees sushi rice and other ingredients pressed into a box mould.
The requirements for making California roll are the same as those for makizushi, with the addition of a sheet of cling film, which is necessary to achieve the inside out effect.
Oden is a traditional Japanese dish, eaten in the colder months, where ingredients are simmered in stock until tender. This version merges the Japanese dish with the classic French pot-au-feu stew.
In Ireland there is a long tradition of adding seaweed to bread. This one is made using sushi nori sheets, which gives it a delicious distinctive flavour. You can serve it warm or cold generously spread with butter. It also goes well with fish, ham, cheese and avocado.
There are many types of okowa in Japan, such as red beans (sekihan) and chestnut okowa, mountain vegetables (sansai) okowa, but you can also make okowa with a variety of ingredients. This recipe is a seasonal okowa with a variety of wild mushrooms and gingko nuts.
This traditional clear soup is packed with healthy ingredients, such as root vegetables and tofu. This variation is made with vegan dashi stock as is only appropriate for Buddhist temple food.
This version of bean paste, also known as ogura-an, uses the whole bean, skin and all, to make this deliciously sticky and sweet jam-like paste, great for desserts and cakes. For a skinless version, see koshian.
This smooth version of bean paste, made with the skins removed, is perfect for making Japanese style cakes and desserts or just pouring over ice-cream. For a version using the whole bean, see tsubuan.
A simple yet delicious variation on an Italian classic. A great way to try out unfamiliar Japanese mushrooms.
This classic dish is a real delight, simple, warming, packed with the goodness of buckwheat.
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